Tag: Unifor

  • Unifor Settlement with GM – Footprint or Toe Tag?

    Did Unifor President Jerry Dias make a deal to save the Oshawa plant, or did he give in and accept GM’s determination to end vehicle production in Oshawa? Just before Christmas last year, GM announced their intention to close Oshawa, meaning the loss of 5,000 direct jobs involved in the assembly of cars and trucks, … Keep reading »

  • GM Oshawa: Lowered Expectations, Unexplored Opportunities

    A little over a generation ago, #GMCanada employed 23,000 hourly and office workers in #Oshawa. The steady decline to GM’s current numbers was accompanied, each step of the way, by the consolation that ‘well, at least some of the jobs remained’. Keep reading »

  • GM Oshawa: Making Hope Possible

    The end of GM Oshawa seems on the verge of becoming the new reality. Overturning this imposed reality can’t be achieved by traditional protest. Keep reading »

  • Taking on the GM Shutdown: Unifor, Oshawa and Community Control

    General Motor’s plan to end production at its Oshawa plant at the end of 2019 is a callous, cynical act by the U.S.-based multinational auto giant that needs to be challenged. After accepting $13.7-billion bailout offered by the Canadian public to the big automakers back in 2008 to keep GM and Chrysler alive (one third … Keep reading »

  • Toyota Autoworkers Take on the Liberals

    About a hundred autoworkers, led by workers from Toyota, and their supporters rallied in front of Queen’s Park in Toronto on April 22. They were protesting the Liberal government’s decision to allow an “exception” for the auto industry for personal emergency leave (PEL) days. Keep reading »

  • Don’t Let a Union Split Tear the Labour Movement Apart

    Dear Canadian union sisters and brothers: There’s a lot to admire about your labour movement. With community organizing, creative street heat, and militant strikes, you’ve just scored the biggest win yet in the Fight for $15, forcing a pro-corporate Ontario government to raise wages for 1.7 million workers and grant new card-check union recognition rights, … Keep reading »

  • Crisis in the Canadian Labour Movement

    A crisis has suddenly erupted within the Canadian labour movement, falling along old divisions of the movement’s archaic organizational structure, and assisted by the lack of any strategic focus or signs of even modest political ambitions beyond self-preservation in either the labour central or any of its affiliates. In the case at hand, the crisis … Keep reading »

  • Ford Unifor Agreement Ratified — Voted Down at Oakville Unit, Local 707

    As bargaining between Unifor and the Canadian branches of the Detroit Three automakers came down to the last company, Ford, the signs were pointing to an emerging resistance to decades of concessions. Amid general opposition on the shop floor, leaders at the biggest Ford local were openly opposing the pattern the union had bargained with … Keep reading »

  • Big Three Bargaining: Different Ways of Making History

    Different Ways of Making History Canadian autoworkers have long been pace setters in the Canadian labour movement and as soon as its most recent agreement with General Motors was ratified, Unifor (the successor in 2013 after the merger of CAW and CEP) laid claim to that agreement’s ‘historic’ status. It has now also been ratified by … Keep reading »

  • The CAW-CEP Merger: New Union in a Difficult World

    Just about everyone in and around the union movement in Canada is talking about the upcoming merger between the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers (CEP). The new union being formed will be the largest private sector union in Canada. While bigger is not necessarily better – as numerous other examples … Keep reading »

  • Concessions in Oshawa: The End of an Era?

    In the early 1980s General Motors workers in Canada refused to follow their American parent (UAW) in opening their collective agreement. The ensuing conflict eventually led to the Canadians breaking away to form their own Canadian union (CAW). Earlier this month the CAW leadership opened the collective agreement in Oshawa, threatening the end of a … Keep reading »