• Will the Ontario Labour Movement Return to Class Struggle as Austerity Deepens?

    The Ontario labour movement is in deep crisis. Some impressive struggles aside, it has been staggering since the end of the great mobilizations of the 1990s. Days of Action was the dramatic class response that emerged in the mid-90s to the radical neoliberal policies and a reminder of the radical potentials of rank and file workers. Keep reading »

  • Labour Day: Signs of Renewal?

    Labour Day Weekend is upon us, and many union activists and their families will be out marching and picnicking, joining with brothers and sisters from other unions in a show of solidarity. While their participation is heartfelt there is no doubt many of them are asking what is there to celebrate? There are a few … Keep reading »

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    Bargaining Over Corporate Investment: Innovation or Trap?

    Ever since the sit-down strikes of the 1930s, the cycle of ‘Big Three’ auto bargaining has been a major economic and political event, an indicator of the progress of the class struggle in North America. If such interest has sagged of late, it charged back into the news with the aggressive declaration of Unifor’s president, … Keep reading »

  • Working Class Politics After the NDP

    Introduction: Crisis in Labour Politics The issue that we can’t ignore this Labour Day is the disorientation in our movement’s politics. List the issues working people are most concerned about today – whether deindustrialization, unemployment and underemployment; access to healthcare, childcare and pensions; poverty, racism, conditions of foreign workers and appalling levels of overall inequality; the … Keep reading »

  • Labour Day 2010: Austerity, Public Services and the Labour Movement

    This Labour Day, like the last two, is dominated by the ongoing global economic crisis. Since 2008 Canada’s workers, working families, and the communities in which we make our lives, have endured a period of deep economic insecurity the likes of which we have not seen since the Great Depression. The crisis began in the … Keep reading »

  • Workers of the World Unite!

    A New Message for Labour Day 2009? What is the significance of the way not only Keynes but even Marx has been brought back into fashion amidst the global economic crisis? This is a question well worth pondering on the day that is officially designated to celebrate the class that Marx saw as carrying the promise … Keep reading »

  • Unions and the Crisis: Ways Forward?

    This May Day, the day of celebration of the international working class movement, arrives in the midst of an international crisis of capitalism. For the first time since the 1930s, the world economy is expected to shrink. As a result, some 50 million workers are being added to the numbers of unemployed; migrant workers as … Keep reading »

  • Labour Day 2008 and Canadian Workers

    Labour Day 2008 in Canada sees a number of longer term trends over this period of neoliberalism intensifying – downward pressures on real wages, growing precarious and marginal work, undermining of public sector services and work, increasing reliance on migrant workers with restricted rights, and mounting global inequalities. A recession resulting from the overaccumulation of … Keep reading »

  • Reviving the Labour Movement Through Reviving Class Solidarity

    LABOUR DAY SEPTEMBER 2007 As Canada and Ontario’s labour movement marches in this year’s Labour Day Parade it does so with something to celebrate: an increase in the provincial minimum wage. That victory, all the more significant for victories being so rare in recent times, was partial – amongst other things it is only being phased … Keep reading »

  • What you Need to Know About May Day

    For more than 100 years, May Day has symbolized the common struggles of workers around the globe. Why is it largely ignored in North America? The answer lies in part in American labour’s long repression of its own radical past, out of which international May Day was actually born a century ago. The seeds were … Keep reading »