• Ontario Election 2018: Right-Wing Populism Prevails Over Moderate Social Democracy

    In the June 7 provincial election, Ontario politics took a sharp turn to the right as the Progressive Conservatives, under the leadership of the populist businessman and former Toronto city councillor Doug Ford, steamrolled to a majority government. Keep reading »

  • Ontario Looks Right

    While U.S. socialists have always challenged the myth of American exceptionalism – that the U.S. is immune to class struggle and a politics linked to it – they tend to have the opposite view of Canadian politics: that the latter is somehow exceptional, rooted in a classic social-democratic and even socialist political culture that makes … Keep reading »

  • Doug Ford – Ontario’s Donald Trump?

    Todd Gordon is interviewed by Ashley Smith about what led to Doug Ford’s election in Ontario and what this means for Canadian politics. Keep reading »

  • What’s at Stake in the Ontario Election

    With just days to go until Ontario voters go to the polls it is worth remembering what is at stake in this election. The Ontario Liberals have been in power since 2003. It is clear their government is well past its due date. Years of scandals, Bay Street policies and austerity have left a sour … Keep reading »

  • Punitive Austerity: Ford, the Tories and the Coming Cuts

    Many Ontarians are captured by the idea of getting the same or more services for less money. But few know what the numbers might actually mean. Since Doug Ford [Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario] did not release a clear platform, Ontarians know more about how much a beer may cost if the … Keep reading »

  • The Ontario Election isn’t about Deficits, and that’s a good thing

    How big is your deficit? This Ontario election, no one seems to care – and that’s a decisive positive to emerge from a campaign that’s too often been submerged in the politics of personality. There is more and more light sneaking through the widening cracks in Canada’s austerity consensus. Hopefully, it will shine not only … Keep reading »

  • Whither Left Electoral Politics in Toronto?

    Analysis of municipal elections and prospects for electing independent left candidates. Keep reading »

  • Norwegian Elections: Another Right-Wing Victory, and a Serious Labour Defeat

    The centre-left failed in getting rid of the so-called ‘blue-blue’ government at the parliamentary elections in Norway on 11 September. The Labour Party was the main loser, while small parties on the centre-left advanced slightly. However, the parliamentary basis of the right-wing government has started to unravel. A deeper political crisis may be looming in … Keep reading »

  • Sunday’s French Election

    The good news this May was that French voters rejected far-right Marine Le Pen by a two-to-one margin in the second round of the Presidential election. “At least the French are not schmucks as the Americans!” were the first words that passed the sweet lips of my Provençal partner Elyane when the radio announced Le … Keep reading »

  • Questions for the Canadian Left

    Harper is gone, but (as a friend only quarter-jokingly said) we got the second worst outcome sold as the best, so now what? That’s the 10 second version of this post. I want to throw out a few questions or, better yet, problems that I think the Canadian Left will have to face together over … Keep reading »

  • Socialist Wins in Seattle — Toronto Next?

    The headline in mic.com ran: “Meet the Most Important Socialist in America Not Named Bernie Sanders.” It was about the impact of open Socialist, Kshama Sawant, who had just been reelected in a Seattle Council election. The article went on to say, “Sanders isn’t the only socialist in the United States making a splash. Kshama … Keep reading »

  • Canada’s Election: Voters Defeat Harper, but Elect Another Trudeau

    Canada’s federal election October 19 was effectively a plebiscite of voter opinion on the decade-long rule by the ultra-neoliberal Conservatives (Tories) led by Stephen Harper. With some 70 per cent of the electorate declaring for “change” in successive polling, the overriding issue was which of the main opposition parties, the New Democratic Party (NDP) or … Keep reading »