Author: Marty Hart-Landsberg

Martin Hart-Landsberg is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon; and Adjunct Researcher at the Institute for Social Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, South Korea. His areas of teaching and research include political economy, economic development, international economics, and the political economy of East Asia. He maintains a blog Reports from the Economic Front.

  • Racism, COVID-19, and the Fight for Economic Justice

    While the Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests sweeping the United States were triggered by recent police murders of unarmed African Americans, they are also helping to encourage popular recognition that racism has a long history of punishing consequences for black people that extend beyond policing. Among these are the enormous disparities between black and white … Keep reading »

  • What’s Driving Trade Tensions Between the U.S. and China

    There is a lot of concern over the possibility of a trade war between China and the USA. In early April, U.S. President Donald Trump announced that his administration was considering levying $100-billion of additional tariffs on Chinese exports, after the Chinese government responded to a previously proposed U.S. tariff hike on Chinese goods of … Keep reading »

  • Tax Cuts: Its All About Capitalism

    Powerful corporations and the rich in the United States continue their winning ways. By narrow margins, both the House of Representatives and Senate have agreed on a budget proposal that calls for an increase in the federal deficit of $1.5-trillion in order to fund a major reform of the U.S. tax system that will make … Keep reading »

  • The Need For A New U.S. Foreign Policy Toward North Korea

    USA-North Korean relations remain very tense, although the threat of a new Korean War has thankfully receded. Still the U.S. government remains determined to tighten economic sanctions on North Korea and continues to plan for a military strike aimed at destroying the country’s nuclear infrastructure. And the North for its part has made it clear … Keep reading »

  • Monopolization and Labour Exploitation

    Those who advocate “freeing the market” claim that doing so will encourage competition and thereby increase majority well-being. These advocates have certainly had their way shaping economic policies. And the results? According to several leading economists, the results include the growing monopolization of product markets and steady decline in labour’s share of national income. Neither … Keep reading »

  • Trump’s Economic Policies Are No Answer To Our Problems

    President Trump has singled out unfair international trading relationships as a major cause of US worker hardship. And he has promised to take decisive action to change those relationships by pressuring foreign governments to rework their trade agreements with the US and change their economic policies. While international economic dynamics have indeed worked to the … Keep reading »

  • Lessons From A Defeat In Europe

    The Troika are celebrating the end of negotiations with Greece, proclaiming that thanks to their tireless efforts the Eurozone remains whole. And why wouldn’t they celebrate. They have demonstrated their power to crush, at least for now, the Greek effort to end austerity and its associated devastating social consequences. Tragically, Syriza has not only surrendered, … Keep reading »

  • Africa And Globalization

    Economists continue to celebrate the free movement of goods, services, and capital. However, faced with slowing economic conditions in core countries, it is now third world growth that is highlighted as proof of the gains from unregulated globalization. As the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development points out: “The crisis and its fallout have … Keep reading »

  • The Need to Work for Peace on the Korean Peninsula

    This long post examines the causes of and offers a response to the dangerous escalation of tensions on the Korean peninsula. While the details of U.S.-North Korean relations are complex, the story is relatively simple. In brief, the U.S. government continues to reject possibilities for normalizing relations with North Korea and promoting peace on the … Keep reading »

  • The Deficit Battle

    The tension mounts as President Barack Obama and Speaker of the House John Boehner appear locked in a battle over how best to slash the federal deficit. The Treasury Department is scheduled to run out of borrowing authority on August 2 unless Congress agrees to raise the federal debt ceiling. No one is sure what … Keep reading »

  • Globalization And Its Consequences

    Although capitalism has always been a global system, the international integration of production and finance and our dependence on cross-border activities seems greater than ever before. At the risk of oversimplifying, we now have a world system within which Latin America, Africa and the Middle East specialize in the production and export of primary commodities, … Keep reading »

  • What’s Happening On The Korean Peninsula?

    What’s happening on the Korean peninsula? If you read the press or listen to the talking heads, your best guess would be that an insane North Korean regime is willing to risk war to manage its own internal political tensions. This conclusion would be hard to avoid because the media rarely provide any historical context … Keep reading »