Author: Herman Rosenfeld

Herman Rosenfeld is a Toronto-based socialist activist, educator, organizer and writer. He is a retired national staffperson with the Canadian Auto Workers (now Unifor), and worked in their Education Department.

  • US Election: What Could it Mean for Canada and the Canadian Left?

    The US election is about much more than Trump, and it provides some food for thought for Canadian socialists. Keep reading »

  • Not Completely a Company Town

    Peter Findlay’s documentary film Company Town provides a welcome opening to initiate discussion and debate about the closure of General Motor’s once massive (it had 23,000 workers at one time) and historically central auto and truck complex and supplier plants. Behind the film’s basic narrative is a countdown from the period between the announcement (November … Keep reading »

  • Challenges and Openings for the Free Transit Movement in Toronto

    Toronto is Canada’s largest city, with a population of 2.7 million (and over 6 million in the Greater Toronto Area). Its public transit system is the third largest in North America, after New York City and Mexico City. It is made up of four subway lines, 11 streetcar routes; and over 140 bus routes. The … Keep reading »

  • Free Public Transit is Key to a Green New Deal: Free Transit for Toronto

    Expansion of public transportation must be central to a just transition, but the subject has been almost entirely missing from the election discussion. Keep reading »

  • Uber-Capitalism: Platform Mobility/Mobilizing Workers

    Bronwyn Frey examines some of the worker organizational strategies emerging within Indonesia’s vast informal transportation sector, where precarity is longstanding and perhaps less exceptional than in the West. Watch video »

  • The Case for Free Public Transit: Just Mobility and Urban Planning

    Toronto launch of a unique book, Free Public Transit – And Why We Don’t Pay to Ride Elevators. The launch featured a discussion about the promises, challenges and social underpinnings of free public transit. Watch video »

  • Ontario Looks Right

    While U.S. socialists have always challenged the myth of American exceptionalism – that the U.S. is immune to class struggle and a politics linked to it – they tend to have the opposite view of Canadian politics: that the latter is somehow exceptional, rooted in a classic social-democratic and even socialist political culture that makes … Keep reading »

  • CAMI Strike 2017

    After Another Setback Can Unifor Move On? A four-week strike at the CAMI assembly plant, that began on September 17th, ended on October 16th. Members of Unifor Local 88 voted 86% in favour of the tentative agreement bargained with the stand-alone GM plant. Located in Ingersoll, Ontario, close to London, it is a former joint venture … Keep reading »

  • The Crisis in the ATU: Labour Shoots Itself in the Foot

    A sign of the tragic disarray of the Canadian labour movement is the extent to which its misadventures keep piling up. As the turmoil within the union representing the Ontario government’s unionized employees (Ontario Public Service Employees Union – OPSEU) hits the press, the chaos continues in Local 113 of the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU). … Keep reading »

  • Ford Unifor Agreement Ratified — Voted Down at Oakville Unit, Local 707

    As bargaining between Unifor and the Canadian branches of the Detroit Three automakers came down to the last company, Ford, the signs were pointing to an emerging resistance to decades of concessions. Amid general opposition on the shop floor, leaders at the biggest Ford local were openly opposing the pattern the union had bargained with … Keep reading »

  • End 2-Tier.

    Bargaining Over Corporate Investment: Innovation or Trap?

    Ever since the sit-down strikes of the 1930s, the cycle of ‘Big Three’ auto bargaining has been a major economic and political event, an indicator of the progress of the class struggle in North America. If such interest has sagged of late, it charged back into the news with the aggressive declaration of Unifor’s president, … Keep reading »

  • The Roots and Contours of Worker Rebellion in a Changing China

    It is impossible to ignore the large and growing wave of worker strikes and protests now rocking China. Just last year there were over 2700 actions, double the numbers of 2014 and more than 500 during this past January alone. They are in response to the Chinese government’s restructuring program of wage cuts, worker layoffs, … Keep reading »