Author: Sam Gindin

Sam Gindin was research director of the Canadian Auto Workers from 1974–2000. He is co-author (with Leo Panitch) of The Making of Global Capitalism (Verso), and co-author with Leo Panitch and Steve Maher of The Socialist Challenge Today, the expanded and updated American edition (Haymarket).

  • Toward A New Politics? After the CAW-NDP Divorce

    On April 21, 2006, the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) broke with a tradition that extended over half a century and voted to leave the New Democratic Party (NDP). A few CAW activists shrugged their shoulders: the impact of the NDP on their daily struggles had been minimal and so setting it aside did not seem … Keep reading »

  • Rewriting History: The CAW Turn

    In response to criticism of the concessions made by the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) at General Motors’s Oshawa facility this winter, the union has made four counter-arguments. First, no concessions were in fact made: the union won jobs through ‘smart bargaining’. Second, contradicting the first point, that concessions may have been made, but trading off … Keep reading »

  • Concessions in Oshawa: The End of an Era?

    In the early 1980s General Motors workers in Canada refused to follow their American parent (UAW) in opening their collective agreement. The ensuing conflict eventually led to the Canadians breaking away to form their own Canadian union (CAW). Earlier this month the CAW leadership opened the collective agreement in Oshawa, threatening the end of a … Keep reading »

  • The CAW’s Direction: Some Questions

    A number of questions about the CAW’s general political and more specific electoral orientation are being asked both inside and outside the union. These are questions of importance to the Canadian Left as a whole. We cite a few such questions and invite comment. First, coming out of GM bargaining in October, 2005 the union … Keep reading »

  • Whose Healthcare?

    Challenging the Corporate Struggle to Rule Our System Hugh Armstrong, et al. Most Canadians reject a private health care system that is driven by the accumulation of profit, that limits people’s access to the size of their wallets and provides health in exchange for the risk of financial debt. Affordable public health care – for one’s own … Keep reading »

  • The GM Layoffs and the Logic of Neoliberalism

    The perverse logic of neoliberalism took even more twisted turns on 21 November 2005. General Motors, the largest manufacturing company in the world, had just months ago been promised $450-million in government money to create jobs in Canada. Keep reading »

  • GM, the Delphi Concessions and North American Workers: Round Two?

    It is important to recall that until the 1970s, collective bargaining in the United States and Canada was largely about workers demanding improvements from their employers. But a new era in collective bargaining erupted at the end of the 1970s that was soon dubbed ‘concessionary bargaining’. Corporations were now the ones making the demands. Tensions … Keep reading »

  • The Auto Industry

    Concretizing Working Class Solidarity: Internationalism beyond Slogans by Sam Gindin. Keep reading »