Author: John McMurtry

John McMurtry is Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. His work has been translated from Latin America through Europe to Japan, and he is the author/editor of UNESCO's three-volume Philosophy and World Problems, as well as more recently, The Cancer Stage of Capitalism: From Crisis to Cure.

  • From Canada’s Election to Public Action

    Beyond the Alberta Tar-Sands For months, during and after Canada’s 2019 federal election campaign, corporate media provided daily frontpage news space for Alberta’s non-stop demands for more tar-sands-export infrastructure through British Columbia, as well as space for discrediting stories on the Trudeau government for his attempt at questionable legal protection of a Quebec big business and … Keep reading »

  • The Koch Brothers and the Tar-Sands

    Big Lies and Ecocide in Canada As we know, big lies can run free across borders with few people joining the dots. For example, no media has been reporting that China’s growing dispute with Canada is based on Canada’s enforcement of the Trump administration’s unilateral embargo against Iran. This is what politicians called ‘the rule of … Keep reading »

  • Tondo slum in Manila, Philippines.

    The Davos Blind Eye: How the Rich Eat the Poor and the World

    The just-released Oxfam Davos report An Economy For the 1% which the mass media have ignored arrestingly shows that 62 individuals (388 in 2010) now own more wealth than 50 per cent of the world’s population. More shockingly, it reports from its uncontested public sources that this share of wealth by half of the world’s … Keep reading »

  • Breaking Out of the Invisible Prison

    The Ten-Point Global Paradigm Revolution As we enter 2015, the global corporate system deepens and spreads in its eco-genocidal effects. But the dots are not joined in their common cause across domains. Money-value coordinates like gross domestic product (GDP), commodity productivity and stock market indexes are still adopted as the measures of “economic performance” rather than … Keep reading »