Author: Carlo Fanelli

Carlo Fanelli is Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Work and Labour Studies at York University. He is the co-editor (with Bryan Evans) The Public Sector in an Age of Austerity: Perspectives from Canada's Provinces and Territories. He is the editor of Alternate Routes: A Journal of Critical Social Research and maintains a blog at carlofanelli.org.

  • A New Type of Political Organization?: The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly

    At the end of the first decade of the twenty-first century, the Left around the world is undergoing reformation. As the Great Recession has vividly demonstrated, more than three decades of neoliberal capitalism have eroded many of the significant gains won in the immediate decades following World War II. From wage and benefit concessions to … Keep reading »

  • Municipal Malaise: Neoliberal Urbanism and the Future of Our Cities

    The 2008 Annual Report by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, written when the Federal government was pulling in nearly $14-billion in budget surpluses, paints a grim picture of the coming collapse of Canada’s municipal infrastructure. The report found that Canada has used up 79 per cent of the service life of its public infrastructure and … Keep reading »

  • Lessons Learned: Assessing the 2009 City of Toronto Strike

    When word came that the 39-day strike by CUPE Locals 79 and 416 had come to an end, the immediate question on most members’ minds was “Did we win?” The information gap between rank and file members and the union executive was so large that many strikers were unaware of why exactly they were on … Keep reading »

  • Managing the Crisis in Toronto: Class Power and Striking City Workers

    After six months of negotiations without a contract and little movement during collective bargaining, City of Toronto workers in CUPE Locals 79 and 416 went on strike on June 22. Local 79 is the largest municipal local in Canada, with a membership of 18,000 although various contingent, seasonal and part-time workers push estimates of membership … Keep reading »