Author: Carlos Torres

Carlos Torres has been an activist in the World Social Forum and a researcher at the Centre for Social Justice in Toronto. After years in exile from the Pinochet regime in Chile, he has returned to research, writing and political activism there.

  • Two Reports from Chile

    The Neoliberal Miracle Under Fire Unexpected turmoil erupted in Chile on October 18th, when high school students mobilized against a subway fare increase. On October 25th, another two million Chileans joined them in opposition to the impacts of neoliberalism in every aspect of life. They are in revolt against political, social and economic abuses stemming from … Keep reading »

  • Crisis in Chile – an interview with Carlos Torres

    Corvin Russel interviews activist and writer Carlos Torres from Santiago on the rapidly developing protests and political crisis in Chile. Keep reading »

  • September 11: Forty Years Later

    On September 11, millions of Chileans commemorate 40 years since the coup d’état in which the Palace of La Moneda in Santiago was attacked by warplanes and President Salvador Allende died fighting the conspirators. This event marked years of state terrorism and bloodshed in our country and the fortieth anniversary of the assault has been … Keep reading »

  • The Chilean Student Movement Against Neoliberalism

    ‘Our future is not for sale’ Perhaps the greatest challenge for the radical left today is to articulate a politics that decisively breaks with the disastrous experiences of many 20th century socialisms. This is a difficult task that requires self-reflection, active questioning, and openness to new expressions of struggle by the always complex and fluid global … Keep reading »

  • The Unexpected Revolution

    The Venezuelan People Confront Neoliberalism Carlos Torres, et al. In Latin America, there have been many peoples and countries with an abundance of deep, radical political traditions, whose struggles regularly fill the headlines of international newspapers. The left from around the world often – in the past and even today – looks to these countries as models … Keep reading »