Author: Steve Ellner

Professor Steve Ellner has taught at the Universidad de Oriente in Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela, since 1977. He is the author of many books on Venezuelan politics, including his latest Latin America's Radical Left.

  • The Crisis in Venezuela

    The Left and Venezuela During the last two months Venezuela has been faced with a terrible wave of violence. It has already resulted in more than 60 deaths along with looted schools, burned public buildings, destroyed public transportation and emptied hospitals. The major media, however, simply engage in a running stream of gruesome denunciations of the … Keep reading »

  • After Chavez: The Maduro Government And The ‘Economic War’ in Venezuela

    Nearly two years after the death of Hugo Chávez, the key question that many on the left are debating, in Venezuela and elsewhere, is whether his successors have been true to his legacy, or whether the ‘revolutionary process’ initiated more than a decade ago has now stalled or even been thrown into reverse. The recent … Keep reading »

  • Terrorism in Venezuela and Its Accomplices

    The private media and important actors both at home and abroad including Washington have downplayed, and in some cases completely ignored, the terrorist actions perpetrated against the Venezuelan government over the past three months. Among the latest examples of terrorism news that have been underreported abroad is the assassination in late April of Eliézer Otaiza, … Keep reading »

  • Can A Country Have A Revolutionary State and A Capitalist Economy?

    An Interview with Steve Ellner At various moments in the interview with Steve Ellner, I welcomed the explanations that he offered in response to my questions. I most identified with the idea of the state as developed by Nicos Poulantzas in which in addition to, and beyond, being an object of a given class, the state … Keep reading »

  • The Deceptive Use of the Phrase “Peaceful Protests” in Venezuela

    The Venezuelan opposition and much of the media use the term “peaceful protests” to distinguish gatherings of protesting students and other young people from the more violent actions including vandalism and shootings carried out by those outside of the university community. “Peaceful protests,” however, is a loaded term that serves to plant doubts about the … Keep reading »

  • The Strategy of the Venezuelan Opposition and How it Works

    The strategy and tactics of the Venezuelan opposition is a replay of events that took place leading up to the coup against Hugo Chávez on April 11, 2002 and is similar (although in some ways quite different) from the script that has been used in the Ukraine and elsewhere. The blatant distortions and in some … Keep reading »

  • Violence in Venezuela Caused by Opposition, Not Government

    The slant of Venezuela’s private media and the international media on what is happening in Venezuela is clear: the government is responsible for the violence. In the first place, it is said, government-ordered gunmen are shooting at peaceful demonstrators and the violence generated by the opposition is just a response to the brutality of police … Keep reading »

  • The Chavez Election

    “You pay back a favour with favours,” said Joanna Figueroa, a resident of El Viñedo, a barrio in the coastal city of Barcelona in eastern Venezuela. She had pledged to work for the reelection of Hugo Chávez after receiving a house as part of the government’s ambitious Great Housing Mission programme. She helped build it, … Keep reading »

  • The Distinguishing Features of Latin America’s New Left In Power

    The Governments Of Hugo Chavez, Evo Morales And Rafael Correa Most political analysts place the governments of Hugo Chávez (Venezuela), Evo Morales (Bolivia) and Rafael Correa (Ecuador) in the same category but without defining their common characteristics. Beginning with the publication of Leftovers in 2008, critics of the left sought to overcome the shortcoming by characterizing … Keep reading »